Survey: Over 72% of Moroccans say corruption is widespread in the public sector

Although constant efforts by the state continue to reduce and put an end to the phenomenon of corruption, more than 72% of Moroccans say that this act of perversion still persists in public institutions and hampers the confidence of citizens, indicated the Arab Barometer.

In its latest report on Morocco, the Arab Barometer revealed that more than seven out of ten Moroccans, or 72%, say that the
corruption is prevalent in state institutions and national agencies, a finding similar to the survey conducted in 2018. However, perceptions of corruption are not evenly shared, noting that socioeconomic factors make up the biggest demographic difference important.

According to the survey, Moroccans with a higher education (67%) are 7 points less likely to recognize corruption compared to those with a high school diploma or less (74%). In addition, 69% of women say corruption is widespread, compared to 75% of men. In a more striking discrepancy, Moroccans who cannot cover their expenses (81%) are 20 points more likely to say that corruption spreads through state institutions and national agencies, compared to those who can cover their expenses (61%).

In addition, the Arab Barometer asked citizens about their perception of their government’s efforts to fight corruption in public institutions and national agencies. Overall, half of Moroccan citizens say the government tackles corruption to a large or moderate extent, and the percentages are even higher among older Moroccans, those with a high school diploma. and those who cannot cover their expenses. Half of citizens aged 30 and over (51%) say the government cracks down on corruption, 42% of those aged 18-29 say the same. Those living in cities are 8 points more likely to say the government is trying to fight corruption than those living in rural areas, 50% versus 43%.

However, research by Transparency International suggests that it is the poorest who most often bear the brunt of demands for bribes, and wealthier Moroccans, who are less likely to have suffered the ramifications of the rampant corruption, may therefore think it is not as widespread because the government is doing a good job of suppressing it.

Another sign of Moroccans’ disparate perceptions of the national and governorate levels is that citizens view the governorate level as less corrupt than the national level. Asked about the level of pervasiveness of corruption at the governorate level, four in ten Moroccans say that almost no or few officials are corrupt, the highest rate of any MENA country surveyed.

Those with a college education are 11 points more likely to agree with this statement than those with a high school diploma or less (48% versus 37%). Meanwhile, citizens who can cover their expenses are twice as likely to think almost no or few officials are corrupt, compared to those who cannot cover their expenses (56% vs. 28%), the report said.

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