Demonstrations in Tunis to protest against President Kaïs Saïed

The celebration, Saturday, of the 59th anniversary of the evacuation took place in Tunisia against a backdrop of great political and social unrest, tension, anger and division between the different political families.

This celebration comes at a time when the country is experiencing yet another tragedy of illegal immigration following the sinking off Zarzis, in the south of the country, of a boat since mid-September costing the lives of 18 people.

A tragedy on the high seas that has fueled discontent and anchored in people’s minds the feeling of powerlessness of the state.

The calamitous management of this drama by the public authorities was the catalyst for nocturnal demonstrations which took place successively in Bizerte, the outlying districts of Tunis and in Zarzis.

The bodies of the 18 missing could not be recovered until after almost a month and the public authorities were confined to a deafening silence.

In this deleterious climate of tension and frustration, many demonstrations were organized on Saturday in Tunis by two political parties that nothing unites, the Free Destourian Party of Abir Moussi, and the Salvation Front made up of five parties, including Ennahdha (Islamist party).

The two formations, however, have a point of convergence. Both consider July 25, 2021 as a “puttch” accusing President Kais Saied of having undermined the democratic experience born of the events of January 14, 2011.

Despite the restrictions imposed by the Ministry of the Interior to dissuade demonstrators from reaching the center of the capital, the demonstrations organized by the PDL and the Salvation Front were imposing.

While denying wanting to hinder the demonstrations of October 15, these services announce that they have prevented at least 7 buses from heading towards the assembly point.

The National Salvation Front deplored the pressure exerted on the citizens who were prevented from accessing the assembly point, denouncing the police practices of another time carried out by the Minister of the Interior, Taoufik Charfeddine, considered to be the arm right of President Saied.

The demonstrators, who converged on the center of the capital, chanted slogans of support for the inhabitants of Zarzis who lost relatives who died at sea during an attempt at illegal emigration and called for the preservation of freedoms, shouting that ” the police state is over”.

The demonstrators repeated slogans hostile to the president, recalling the disastrous situation of the country, the shortages and the crises which are undermining it.

The leader of the National Salvation Front, Ahmed Nejib Chebbi affirmed that they “were very close to victory”.

Believing that the President of the Republic is in total isolation, he called on the opposition to intensify its protest movements to denounce the “coup d’etat”.

Nejib Chebbi estimated that the next elections “will be another failure”, recalling that the Salvation Front has already announced its boycott of the entire July 25 process.

For its part, the Free Destourian Party organized an imposing march to denounce the policy of the power in place “which aims to starve and impoverish the people and the attacks on their economic and social rights”.

Abir Moussi, president of the PDL accused the power in place of having prevented demonstrators from all over the country from arriving in the capital to take part in the party’s march.

This demonstration recorded violent clashes between the demonstrators of the order who resorted to tear gas.

Many people have been identified requiring the intervention of the civil protection services to present care.

In Bizerte, where a ceremony was organized in the morning to celebrate the evacuation party, President Kais Saied found nothing better than to add fuel to the fire.

He declared in particular “that there will be another evacuation in Tunisia, the one that will allow Tunisia to get rid of all those who want to attack its independence by being agents of a foreign country”.

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