The righteousness of expatriates from France in Agadir towards the far right

French consular polling stations around the world, during the April presidential election, overwhelmingly voted for Emmanuel Macron, ahead of Marine Le Pen. In the second round, the French president was well ahead of his competitor in the vast majority of polling stations on the planet. The National Rally (RN) candidate only came first in Moscow, Saint Petersburg and Almaty (Kazakhstan).

In Morocco, beyond the results which enabled the outgoing president to succeed himself, it is clear that the far right has strengthened its base through the scores obtained where the proportion of far right voters is much higher than before as much in Marrakech as in Agadir with respectively more than 21% and 27%. The two Moroccan cities are those that welcome and host a large community of French seniors.

It was in Agadir that the RN of Marine le Pen, which based its political strategy on the stigmatization of immigration, had the most votes (27.85%) in Morocco. In 2017 it was already the case. The daily Le Monde (MondeAfrique), as an investigation into the temptation of the National Rally in a fringe of the French in Africa, met French residents who confirmed the normality of this vote ” which has nothing to do with Morocco. It is related to what is happening in France “.

For the evening daily, this apparent paradox is almost an enigma. And to wonder: How can you vote for the extreme right in a French ballot when you have chosen to reside, often for retirement, on the African continent? Is it not contradictory to benefit for oneself from total freedom of movement, even of residence, in Djerba (Tunisia), Agadir (Morocco) or Saly (Senegal), and to join, at the same time, to a vision of France closed, or unfriendly, to migrations in the opposite direction? It is an understatement to say that the electoral behavior, during the recent presidential election of April 10 and 24, of certain communities of French people living in the south of the Mediterranean is causing trouble. At the very least it deserves to be questioned “.

Without wanting to trivialize the success of Emmanuel Macron who, all the same, was acclaimed in these three countries, it is a bit of the story of the train that hides another.

Back to Morocco! Number of French people, mostly retirees, seduced by “good weather, proximity to France, security, the French language, the kindness of Moroccans” but also, by the reception conditions, the cost of living, a generous taxation and other advantages, have settled in the Kingdom and like it so much that they have deduced this conclusion, to say the least “shining ” and which says a lot about the state of mind of the Moroccan expatriate in Souss-Massa land, ” Moroccans from here, they are not the same as in France”.

Eh yes ! it is that the advantages of this district that is Agadir are not lacking for these 5,200 French people registered at the consulate (that is to say three times more than ten years ago, and what is more, are the oldest in Morocco). Half of those registered on the consular electoral list during the last presidential election were over 60 years old in Agadir, including dual nationals. Which should have blocked the far right, but nay! As a reminder, we voted almost a third during the second round for Marine Le Pen, ahead of Marrakech (1/5th) and less than 10% in Rabat, Casablanca, Tangier and Fez.

“Here, people feel safe and they would like it to be the same in France, more orderly, more disciplined, less lax”, declared to the media, Catherine Tribouart, vice-president of the Union of the French abroad (UFE) in Morocco and president of the consular council of Agadir, who adds that “the older we get, the more we aspire to a quiet and fearless life”.

And precisely in the chapter of aging well, they are anecdotes as declarations and we leave it to you to revel in them. In France “foreigners, with all their help, sometimes live better than retirees who have contributed all their lives” or those who “promote too much that they are Muslims”. “We are benevolent towards Moroccans, we adapt to the standards of the country, we do not claim the construction of dozens of churches”, this sexagenarian is indignant, considering that, “When you immigrate to a country, you have to know how to remain discreet”.

This one, coming from an ex-keeper of a creperie in France converted into a seller of roast chicken and pork on the markets, is also nice: “Young people were passing my stand, they were spitting and shouting halouf”, “pig” in Arabic. “There are immigrants in France who want to impose their way of life, take advantage of aid and do not respect anything.

But the hatred of immigrants, all things considered, does not stop there. “MRE” (Moroccans residing abroad) recognizable by their “accent of the cities” enjoy the beaches of Agadir during the summer season, they pass in front of everyone in the queues at the supermarket, listen to the ” loud music ” on the beach and mistreat the locals. “They think everything is allowed, regret this one. We are polite, we respect local customs. The same is expected of immigrants in France”.

We will remember to conclude this appeased ardor: “Some of the immigrants in France have no respect for French laws. This weighs in the electoral choices ”.

After more than thirty years of diplomatic career in various parts of the world, it is in Morocco that Patrick Mayne, 61, a fan of golf and all-terrain vehicles, has settled down. He praises this very civilized country, in contradiction with a France which seems to him to be drifting: “People see how it is in France and how it is in Morocco. Here, the police are respected, delinquency is repressed, justice is not lax”, he points out.

And in view of the news in France, he will say: ” the May Day incidents, the almost daily stabbings, the neighborhoods where “no one is going anymore” It is not in Morocco that you will see lawless zones or people fleeing from a police check! “. Say like that by Le Monde, as African as it is, Morocco is a country that is ready to make people dream.

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